the purple sage

Cutest Little Helper

Hey Yall, I had a cutest little helper in the studio this week.

My Grandson

My Grandson

While I was wrapping and packing up all of our smell goodies, aka soaps, this little helper was smelling everything.  And I mean everything.  He would pick up a soap, smell and say “pretty”.  Then he proceeds to unpack all that I had packed up.  Lol, nothing like having to do double the work.  But I gotta tell ya, I was loving it and enjoying every minute.  Ya know it warms my heart that my cutest little helper thinks his Memaw’s soap smell “pretty”.

Now keep in mind this little helper is only 2 years old…but smart…awe come on, what grandparent doesn’t think their grandchild is smart…tehehe, cause you know they are.  But anyway, while we were out shopping at Whole Foods, he picks up a block of cheese and says “soap”.  I had to laugh, it really was too cute.  Of course my soap looks much prettier than a block of cheese, but you get the picture, it was the size and shape.

Anytime I get in a new shipment of essential oils, he’s always asking to smell.  Especially if he sees me smelling them.  And ya know I have to smell them all before restocking the supply cabinet.  So you can rest assured, that the soap you buy has been approved by the cutest little helper.

Until next time, Blessings and Bubbles,

Sandy

Soap Making Tools of the Trade

Soap Making Tools

Soap Making Tools

Hey Yall, have you ever wondered what are the tools of the trade for soap making?  Well, I would like to give you a quick rundown of what I use.

First, a good scale, this is a must.  I also need measuring cups, and lots of them.  The measuring cups hold the fragrance or essential oils that will scent the soap.  They are also handy for mixing the herbs that go into some of our soaps.  There are different sizes for different needs.  Some of the larger ones are used when I do multiple colors.  Next would be the plastic buckets that I use to make the soap batter.  I do use smaller ones for the smaller batches when needed.  Lol, a little less mess to clean up, and I’m all about less mess.  You should see how many tools/dishes I wash for each batch…crazy, I tell ya.  I also use plastic drink pitchers to mix up the lye and water.  Of course these are labeled so that there is no mistaking what is in there, in an effort to avoid an accident.  There are also various spoons, slotted, ladles, measuring spoons, and just spoons for stirring.

For me the piece de resistance would have to be my purple stick blender.  Soap can be made without a stick blender…but that takes way too long.  Using a good stick blender helps the oils, butters and lye mix up rather nicely.  And it makes quick work of that part too.

Then I have a good mold to pour the soap batter into to rest and saponify.  Molds come in many different shapes and sizes.  I prefer to use log molds.  I do have several others that I use on a whimsy, or for overflow when my soap batter is more than my molds will hold for a certain batch.  A good soap cutter is also a must.   I make a lot of soap, so I need something to hold the soap while it cures.  I use cardboard boxes.  These are just the necessities to measure and make the soap.

There are a few what I call luxuries, and for me that was my bakers rack.  I use this to hold the soap molds while the soap is saponifying.  Then I use it to hold my soap as it’s curing for the first few days.  Other luxuries would be heavy duty metal oil warmers and lye tanks.  I see those in my future…

I hope this gave you a quick look at all the tools that I use.  Most of the same ones used in my kitchen.  Soap making is like cooking.  But as my son will tell ya, I make better soap than I cook.  Be sure to check out our soaps.

Until next time, Blessings and Bubbles,

Sandy

Patchouli Essential Oil

Patchouli

Patchouli

Hey Yall, another of my favorite essential oils is Patchouli…specifically East Indian Patchouli.  Now, don’t turn your nose up when I mention Patchouli…at least not just yet…let me finish before you do…I might just change your mind, lol.

Patchouli is one of those scents you either love it or hate it…there seems to be no in between that I have seen.  I have to be honest, when I first started making products and had to use Patchouli essential oil, I would hold my nose…I was one of those that just didn’t like it…but it was needed to anchor some of my most popular scents…so I used it.  Well as luck would have it, I had misplaced a bottle of Patchouli essential oil in the back of my oil supply cabinet.  I say luck, cause if you know me, I’m so OCD that all my oils are in alphabetical order, so there is no way for things to get lost…it just doesn’t happen…but I digress.  So I’m looking for an essential oil and I come across this “old” bottle of Patchouli…and I know it’s old…cause I date everything…OCD I tell ya.  Anyway, it was about 4 years old, so I opened it to check and see if it was still good to use for personal use.  Can you say OMGawd!!!!  This stuff was the most amazing smelling Patchouli I had EVER smelled…and from then on I have been a lover of Patchouli.

After doing some research, I have found that Patchouli essential oil is like a fine wine…the more it ages the better it gets.  This will also enhance any blend that the aged Patchouli has been added to…gives it more depth.  Sorta hard to explain, but yall know how good my soaps and other products with Patchouli smell…nuff said!

Patchouli has typically been associated with the 60’s and the hippie movement.  Maybe I’m just an old hippie born in the wrong decade…but I have to tell you about this sweet little girl that buys soaps from me, well her Mama buys the soaps.  This sweet child is all of 11 and as you might have guessed she loves my Patchouli soap…her Mama has tried to steer her to some of the Lavenders or other girlie scents…and she stands her ground and tells her Mama she wants the Patchouli…oh my a girl after my own heart.  Gotta love it!

Patchouli also has some health benefits such as antidepressant, anit-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, diuretic, deodorant, insecticide and sedative.  As with any essential oil, always use caution.  Always add to a carrier oil such as olive or coconut oil.  This information is based on historic use of Patchouli, for general reference, and our own personal experiences with Patchouli.  In no way do we claim to cure, treat or prevent any disease.

Check out our Patchouli soap.  Geaux ahead…I dare ya!

Until next time, Blessings and Bubbles,

Sandy

Emu Oil

Emu

Emu

So what is Emu oil?  First let’s learn a little bit about this big bird.  Yes, it’s a big bird, but not the yellow big bird we all know.  The Emu is native to Australia and is the 2nd largest bird, brown and black in color.  It is a flightless bird that when stands upright is 5 to 6 feet tall, and when full grown can weigh anywhere from 85 to 125 lbs.  For a bird, it can run fast and jump high.  The females lay the eggs, usually in winter at dark…the male actually hatches the eggs after sitting on them for 50 days…with little food or activity…except for occasional stretching.  Emu’s are vegetarians and love to eat green leafy veggies.

When looking for quality emu oil, look for a ranch that produces its own birds.  One that practices proper care of the birds.  By producing the birds themselves, they can control the quality of the oil.  Meaning that no unnecessary growth hormones are being used, since this does carry over into the oil.  Every part of the emu is used, nothing is wasted.  I hear the meat is good, just have not tried any, yet.

The fat is removed from the bird and refined like any other oil.  Usually the oil is pressed through then paper filters, then sent to a spinner to remove any remaining water, and finally sent through a vacuum to remove any odor.  The oil is then tested for purity.  The oil should be pearly white in color and creamy.

Emu oil is made up of mono and poly unsaturated fatty acids, very similar to human skin, with high levels of linolenic acid.  Mono and poly unsaturated acids are important for healthy skin, while linolenic acid produces an anti-inflammatory effect.  Emu oil has a unique ability to penetrate deep into the skin and is absorbed quickly.   The Aborigines have long used emu oil for a variety of skin conditions as well as muscle and joint pain.  Emu oil can be applied topically, either by itself or in combination with other quality ingredients. #IBN30

We love our Emu oil products!

Until next time, Blessing and Bubbles,

Sandy